Manhatten Research announced a new release of their Physicians and Emerging Information Technologies advisory service called “Taking the Pulse: U.S. — Physicians and Emerging Information
Technologies,” is based on responses from 1,353 U.S. physicians in the
first quarter of 2007. From the iHealthBeat summary:

According to the survey, physicians are hooked on mobile devices. In
fact, more than 40% of doctors own an MP3 player, exceeding that of the
general population of males or females ages 18 to 34. Approximately 20%
of physicians said they listened to or downloaded audio files online
for professional purposes.

About
50% of respondents reported that they use PDAs, up from about 30% in
2001. Those who own these devices are highly likely to invest in a drug
reference database, Abreu said, noting that physicians with PDA drug
reference databases often use the resource more than 10 times per day.

The
use of electronic drug reference databases is indicative of an overall
movement from offline to online information resources. Between 2005 and
2007 there has been a 14% decrease in physicians' use of offline
conferences and a 13% increase in use of online conferences, which
Abreu called a “really drastic shift.”

Also, the use of
offline medical journals has dropped 14%, while the use of online
journals has jumped 27%. Replacing print journals, online journals
“almost becoming the new norm for physicians,” Abreu said.

Not
all technologies have caught on in the physician community. Fewer than
10% of respondents in the past 12 months said they subscribed to either
a podcast or an RSS feed for professional purposes and only about 20%
said they have read a blog.

Despite varying rates of
popularity among different applications, there is still a strong
movement toward technology adoption among physicians. It's “an
evolving, technology-savvy physician that we're seeing today,” Abreu
said. She added that the key is “not to underestimate the degree to
which the Internet and technology has impacted physician behavior.”

[Hat tip: iHealthBeat]