Defining the Point of Care Market

Defining the Point of Care Market

It’s useful to segment and analyze markets for developing company and product strategy or analyzing competitor’s actions. Such an exercise helps illuminate why companies and markets do what they do – and what they might do in the future. In getting ready for this year’s HIMSS in Orlando, I’ve been thinking about the point of care (PoC) market. At the first Medical Device Connectivity conference in 2009, I defined the PoC market as the workflow and data associated with direct patient care in nursing units, the ED, surgery and related areas. This contrasts with EMRs managing orders, diagnostics, capturing charges  and generally documenting things for the medical/legal record. (You can download a PDF of the presentation here.)

Many devices and software applications used at the PoC are FDA regulated medical devices because they are directly used in the diagnosis or therapy of patients. Because the PoC is where direct patient care is delivered, most PoC solutions meet the FDA’s definition of a medical device. Imagine a layer cake:

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Role of Montoring Techs in Alarm Notification

Role of Montoring Techs in Alarm Notification

Challenges with alarm notification and fatigue have plagued the health care industry for decades. Long before alarm notification systems like Emergin (now Philips IntelliSpace Event Management) and GlobeStar Systems (ConnexAll) appeared, some hospitals addressed alarm issues with the original alarm notification system, monitoring techs. Monitoring techs remain an accepted and effective tool in the constant battle to reduce alarm fatigue and avoid failure-to-rescue events.

With the growing adoption of electronic alarm notification systems, is there still a role for monitoring techs? Are electronic alarm notification systems superior to flesh and bone monitoring techs? This blog post will explore monitoring techs as a solution and consider whether they might be a compliment to an alarm notification system, or whether an alarm notification system should take the place of monitor techs.

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Guidelines for Using Wi-Fi for Medical Devices

Guidelines for Using Wi-Fi for Medical Devices

On a recent LinkedIn group discussion, the following question was posed by Taimoore (Tim) Rajah of the NIH:

We are encountering many hospital which are still based on wired LAN technology for medical device connectivity. Many have mentioned their gripes and major concerns about using Wi-Fi technology for patient monitoring and drug delivery monitoring in the OR as well as ICU departments.

Many hospitals are still using WMTS telemetry in their more critical patient monitoring areas. This is very expensive and maintenance for such a system is costly.

Can you tell us what are the major criteria to ensure a reliable safe and secure Wi-Fi network for medical devices?

If a hospital decides to use Wi-Fi technology, what are the proper guidelines to which they must adhere, to ensure that their current and future Wi-Fi network will be stable, reliable, safe and secure? What are the important features they should consider seriously before embarking on using this type of technology?

Great questions. Here we go with some answers:

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Order Workflows

Order Workflows

Except for emergent situations, no medical device is used without an order. And if not an order written to accomplish a certain clinical task for a specific patient, then “standing” orders captured in written policies and procedures to handle frequent, routine situations. Consequently, orders are one of the first workflow steps in medical device connectivity. Orders are pervasive, used in all health care delivery environments from acute care hospitals to patient’s homes.

Principal ways connectivity can add value to medical device are enhancing patient safety, improving clinical efficacy and productivity. That the inappropriate use or misuse of medical devices can result in patient injury or death is not news. Proper use or misuse can start with the order. Well designed and implemented order workflow automation in a connectivity solution can impact patient safety, the efficacy and utilization of the medical device, and staff/unit productivity. Besides their own unique considerations, order workflows share many of the risks and potential benefits of other types of connectivity workflows.

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Scheduling Workflow

Scheduling Workflow

Scheduling is not a workflow one normally associates with medical device connectivity. In some applications, scheduling is handled by software separate from the connectivity solution. Sometimes, scheduling is not done at all. In other applications, as we shall see, scheduling is so much a part of the broader workflow, that it’s hard to recognize as a scheduling task. Two illustrative aspects of scheduling will be discussed, scheduling for diagnostic modalities and scheduling for routine patient care tasks. Because it’s less understood (and frankly more interesting) we will look at scheduling for routine patient care tasks first.

Patient Care Task Scheduling

Patient care tasks encompass routine activities carried out by caregivers and/or aids. Examples of these routine tasks include vital signs collection, medication administration, bed turns (to avoid hospital acquired pressure ulcers, or HAPU), and respiratory circuit flushing (to avoid ventilator acquired pneumonia, VAP). These tasks must be completed at a predetermined frequency on a reliable basis or adverse events – including patient death – can result.

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