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Author: Tim Gee

How to Eliminate Innovation Obstacles

Innovation — whether in business, technology or health care delivery — is about figuring out how to do something in a new and better way. To succeed we must overcome challenges and obstacles, and one of the most common challenges is the unknown. Fortunately there are methods and tools for gaining most of the knowledge necessary to innovate; we will discuss some of them in this post. Into the Unknown By definition, when you’re innovating, you’re doing something that hasn’t been done before — if not ever, at least by your organization. These things for which you and your organization lack experience...

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The Best Way to Prepare to Text Physician Orders

How We Got Here Back in May 2016, the Joint Commission (JC) issued an update in their Perspectives publication describing their new position on allowing the secure texting of physician orders. (You can download a PDF of the update here.) This update reversed a position the JC laid out in 2011, “…stating that it is not acceptable for physicians […] to text orders for patient care, treatment, or services to the hospital or other health care settings.” The May 2016 update stated, “…effective immediately, the JC has revised its position on the transmission of orders for care, treatment and services via...

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How to Ensure Operational Support Keeps Up with Product Innovation

The business delivery system (BDS) for a company includes all of the operational resources, services, policies and procedures used by the company to generate sales, and successfully install, service and support the company’s systems. Every company’s business delivery system is optimized to support the requirements arising from the features and technologies in their products. Innovations like new connectivity features often have a substantial impact on a company’s BDS. In most situations, product features and technologies change gradually over time and require little focus on BDS optimization. New and innovative products incorporating new technologies can generate new requirements for a company’s BDS. Perhaps...

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Methods to Access Alarm Data for Analysis

Difficulty getting access to alarm data is the elephant in the living room in the house of alarm fatigue. There are lots of conference presentations, webinars and papers about analyzing medical device alarm data. What’s missing are detailed discussions on how to get to the actual alarm data in the first place. This post will present a framework for the hardest part of alarm analysis:  getting access to alarm data so it can be analyzed. We’re going to define the kind of data we’re seeking, where it can be found, the various ways to get access to said data and finally, analytical tools....

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HIMSS16 Recap

It was great to see so many blog readers and old friends at HIMSS this year. For those who downloaded my list of connected health exhibitors, how did the list work for you? I found sorting by booth number really cut down on running back and forth across the show floor. The exhibits are always the big draw for me at HIMSS, and this year was no exception. Where else can you meet with companies ranging from embedded system medical devices to digital health to horizontal market IT solutions? This year I visited and talked with 45 companies, all...

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4 Ways Health Care Is Different

As a $1.7 trillion market with $3.24 trillion in health care expenditures in 2015, the US health care market can be a pretty tempting target to companies, entrepreneurs and investors outside of health care. There’s a lot of opportunity (not to mention needs) in health care, yet the track record of non-health care companies (including startups with non-health care management) is poor – especially when it comes to big companies. Last week I came across an article that touched on the source of a lot of griping by health care outsiders, the increased level of regulations in health care compared to other big verticals....

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HIMSS16 Preview

It’s back to Las Vegas for HIMSS16 in a bit more than a week, which begs the question, what’s going to be theme of this year’s show? There’s typically very little data to apply to questions like that, until now. Drew Ivan, Healthcare Solutions Strategist with Orion Health, wrote a post on LinkedIn on HIMSS16 trends – with data! There’s a great diagram that compares the number of presentations under educational session categories have changed between 2015 and 2016. As an example, here are the top 5: Care Coordination and Population Health – up substantially over last year Process Improvement, Workflow, and...

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4 Models for Alarm Vigilance

The method of arranging medical devices and those that recognize and respond to alarms is fundamental to alarm safety. The following are the 4 models or methods for alarm vigilance and notification in use today. These models are: line of sight,out of sight, monitoring techs, and automated notification. Let’s look at each one in turn. LINE OF SIGHT Back in the day when electronic medical devices were first used in hospitals, patient care areas were organized as wards. Patients were arranged in beds around the perimeter of a larger room with caregivers stationed somewhere along the perimeter or in the center...

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Monitoring for Deteriorating Conditions

Monitoring patients at risk of a deteriorating clinical condition (DCC) is a growing patient monitoring need in almost every hospital. Here’s why…  For many years, the need to monitor patients outside traditional high acuity units has been a growing requirement in hospitals. Signs of this growing need have been evident in a number of areas: Years ago, a common hospital patient flow bottleneck was the telemetry unit. This was often because patients who did not meet admission criteria were placed in that unit because the attending felt the patient was at risk of deterioration and telemetry was the lowest acuity...

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FDA Issues Draft Guidance on Cybersecurity

The FDA sets manufacturer’s expectations on what is expected to address data security threats in medical devices. This draft guidance (pdf download) applies to conventional embedded system medical devices with embedded software (firmware or programmable logic) and software products regulated as medical devices. Think about that for a few seconds and let the scope of impact become clear in your mind. The FDA press release hits the high points. Perhaps the biggest is this statement (emphasis mine): For the majority of cases, actions taken by manufacturers to address cybersecurity vulnerabilities and exploits are considered “cybersecurity routine updates or patches,”...

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